What should I do if I’m being sexually harassed by a client or customer?

People who would never sexually harass co-workers sometimes believe that it’s ok to sexually harass others if they are a client or customer of the business. Employment attorney Jack Tuckner describes the actions you should take if you’re being sexually harassed by a client or customer.

Texas abortion law, right to choose and right to continued employment while pregnant

The United States Supreme court’s recent decision allowing the state of Texas to ban all abortions after six weeks of pregnancy, is a constitutionally invalid, discriminatory law that will greatly affect women and hurt women, particularly poor and minority women, due to the sex-based imposition on them, precluding them from controlling their own bodies.

Should I Quit My Job If I’m Being Sexually Harassed or Subjected to Discrimination?

Don’t quit. If you’re dealing with discrimination in the workplace, a hostile work environment, you’re being treated differently as a woman, a person of color, because of your age, because your disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, there are a number of protected categories under federal and almost every state’s law, that will protect you from being treated differently.

Black Hair Discrimination in the Workplace and New York’s CROWN Act

Employers in New York, Connecticut and New Jersey now, three states out of only 11 in the United States that ban discrimination based on natural hairstyles, worn by people of color, most often women of color who were told that their braids, cornrows any type of natural hair is unacceptable in the workplace.

It’s the Best Time Ever to be Pregnant and Working! Find out why!

Under federal law (if you work for an employer with at least 15 employees), you are covered by the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, the Civil Rights Act, which protects you from discrimination based on your sex, which all of course pregnancy-related issues are inseparable from your gender and who you are as a woman.

DON’T QUIT YOUR JOB. Call a lawyer first. Find out why.

Quitting your job is just giving up and doing your employer a favor, and most of the time when you quit you’ll also be ineligible to even collect unemployment benefits, never mind being able to take your employer to court, which is near impossible once you’ve voluntarily resigned.